Choosing a hot tub is a bit like picking a new car. Price is important, but so are practical considerations like how many people will need to fit comfortably inside it.

Some folks will need a hot tub that can handle a gaggle of family and friends, while others will need only a small, private spa for themselves and maybe a significant other. While this may seem a straightforward decision, it can actually require some forethought, and a bit of projecting yourself and your situation into the future. After all, well-maintained hot tubs can last for years and years, and what might be true for today can change significantly in the near future.

Only you know the answer to most of these questions. A good place to start is by asking yourself if you are likely to have friends and family over to enjoy a nice soak. If so, a multi-person hot tub will be necessary. If not, a small hot tub will probably suffice (and cost less, of course).

In America, the majority of hot tub owners are middle-aged. This makes it more likely that they'll be visited by their adult children and grandkids - if not immediately, then certainly within a few years. Don't make the common mistake of forgetting to factor this inevitability into your hot tub purchasing decision! It could lead to some hurt feelings and crying grandkids.

The size of the spa is the biggest price determinator. If you have a limited amount of disposable income on which to spend on a new hot tub, you might try to find a happy medium in terms of size. For example, let's say you calculate that you want a multi-person tub that can handle eight at a time, but you simply can't afford it. One solution is to get a four or five-person spa and run shifts when you have visitors who want to soak. It's a workable compromise, and you won't have to take out a second mortgage to buy a huge hot tub! Hot tub models and sizes.